Percentage of new entrants to Grade 1 of primary education with early childhood education experience

Definition

Total number of new entrants to Grade 1 of primary education who have attended some form of organised early childhood care and education (ECCE) programmes, expressed as a percentage of the total number of new entrants to primary education.

Data source

School register, school survey or census for data on enrolment.

Calculation method

Divide the number of new entrants to Grade 1 of primary education who have attended some form of organized ECCE programme by the total number of new entrants to Grade 1 of primary education, and multiply by 100.

Data required

New entrants to Grade 1 of primary education who have attended some form of organized ECCE programme, and total number of new entrants to Grade 1 of primary education.

Interpretation

A high percentage of new entrants to Grade 1 of primary education who have attended some form of organized ECCE programme indicates that a large proportion of these children have participated in organized learning activities prior to entering primary school. Progress in schooling is often associated with cognitive abilities acquired at young ages. It is commonly recognized that prior participation in ECCE programmes can play an important role in a child's future education, because they shape attitudes toward learning and develop basic social skills, but the effect of ECCE activities on children’s cognitive development may vary according to the programme attended.

Limitations

This indicator may give an exaggerated picture of access to ECCE programmes, since those children who have access to these programmes are also more likely to have access to primary schools.

Purpose

To assess the proportion of new entrants to Grade 1 who presumably have received some preparation for primary schooling through ECCE programmes.

Quality standards

The percentage of new entrants to Grade 1 of primary education who have attended some form of organized ECCE programme cannot exceed 100%. Obtaining data for this indicator will be a problem in many countries. Useful data may exist in school registration records, and school census instruments may also be geared to collecting this information. Otherwise, the data could be gathered through a sample survey of schools or through household surveys.

Types of disaggregation

By sex.